Archive: News | Announcements

Sarah Ioannides to teach First Annual Cascade Conducting Masterclass

The first annual Cascade Conducting Masterclass at Pacific Lutheran University will feature principle members of Symphony Tacoma leading the Cascade Conducting Orchestra in a program that will focus on score analysis, baton technique, and will offer 17 plus hours of quality podium time with the Cascade Conducting Orchestra. Time will also be dedicated to discussion of the business and media aspects of conducting, including applying and auditioning for conducting positions, crafting a resume, public relations, and how to balance these practical aspects of the business while maintaining one’s unique musical identity.

 

“…Through what is undoubtedly a very challenging business, yet a highly worthwhile and valuable art form, one has to stay true to the music throughout. Preserving one’s own talent, faith to the music and performance integrity while navigating a successful path forward is imperative, so that great symphonic music can live on and not only be cherished by generations to come, but be a more relevant and effective platform for peace, expression and understanding of our world.” ~Sarah Ioannides

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Metropolitan Opera star joins Symphony Tacoma for Season Finale: Wagner & Poulenc

Metropolitan Opera soprano Kelly Cae Hogan joins Symphony Tacoma and Symphony Tacoma Voices for a program of selections by composers Richard Wagner and Francis Poulenc. The concert marks the end of the Symphony’s 2017-18 season and will take place in the Pantages Theater at 7:30 pm on Saturday, May 12, 2018.

 

American soprano Kelly Cae Hogan has attracted international attention for her dramatic portrayals in Wagner, Strauss, Verdi and Puccini. She sang Brünnhilde in Wagner’s Der Ring des Nibelungen for Opera North at the Royal Festival Hall in London, as well as on tour in several other UK cities. At the Metropolitan Opera in New York, she sang in Shostakovich’s Lady Macbeth of Mtsensk as well as Gerhilde in Die Walküre. A native of Iowa, Hogan was a winner of the American Opera Awards and a New York winner of the MacAllister Awards.

 

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Heaven with Theatrical Flair: Symphony Tacoma Welcomes the Hip Harpist

By Chrstian Carvajal of The Weekly Volcano

 

Since before her first album in 1985, Henson-Conant has been broadening her repertoire to include a variety of styles from Irish traditional to highbrow heavy metal. She plays the instrument she commissioned and helped design, an 11-pound sound machine named for her: the CAMAC DHC Light Blue electric harp. The origin of that custom-built instrument is the subject of her recent TED Talk. She earned a Grammy nomination for Best Classical Crossover Album for the soundtrack to her 2006 DVD, Invention & Alchemy.

 

Her upcoming appearance with Symphony Tacoma falls on Earth Day, so Henson-Conant seized on that opportunity to feature songs about the earth and our place in it. She sees her own role — in this case, in front of an orchestra — as a symbolic bridge between the individual human and her planetary community. She notes the organic construction of many classical instruments, which ties their resonant personalities to the natural world and reminds us yet again of our interdependence within it.

 

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Journey Into the Unknown: Symphony Tacoma Presents a Trio of Titans

 

By Christian Carvajal of the Weekly Volcano

 

Symphony Tacoma will present Beethoven’s “Symphony No. 10” this Sunday alongside Brahms’ Symphony No. 1, which was written in conscious homage to Beethoven’s Ninth, and a Haydn concerto that highlights the talents of principal trumpeter Charles Butler. “This seemed just the right timing and program to feature (Butler),” said Ioannides, “who has had an incredibly wonderful career, formerly also the principal of Seattle Symphony.” Butler, who began his career with the Los Angeles Chamber Orchestra, is the principal trumpeter for Portland Opera and a substitute for Oregon Ballet Theater and Pacific Northwest Ballet.

 

“Everybody will take away different meaningful moments,” Ioannides says of an upcoming Tacoma rendition. “I always recommend to a listener, when you hear something for the first time, to lose any sense of expectations and … allow it to take you on a journey into the unknown. … Look for the beauty of contrast. Look for the complexity of polyphonic lines … Follow the peaks and valleys, as you would exploring any new landscape.”

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LIVE: NATIONAL YOUTH ORCHESTRA

The National Youth Orchestra, South Africa’s symphonic national team, will perform the Fourth Symphony of Tchaikovsky, and Stravinksy’s playful neo-classical Pulcinella Suite in Pretoria and Johannesburg from 14 to 16 December 2017.

 

These performances will be done under the baton of acclaimed United States conductor Sarah Ioannides, who is listed as one of the top 20 female conductors worldwide. Ioannides’ dynamism has won praise from audience and critics alike. Her engagements have taken her to five continents. This tour will mark her South African debut.

 

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Conducting’s glass podium: Female music directors are still rare, but the Northwest has nurtured some

Melinda Bargreen for the Seattle Times

 
When the Seattle Symphony presents its annual “Messiah” Dec. 15-17, there will be a woman on the podium…

 

This is a milestone worth considering. The mere fact that female conductors are a comparative rarity around the world, at a point in history when women instrumentalists are commonplace — female orchestra musicians make up 36 percent of the Seattle Symphony — is an indication of the glacial rate of progress for women in ascending the podium.

 
The Australian-born Ioannides was named by the Los Angeles Times as one of several female conductors cracking the “glass podium” and was termed part of “a new wave of female conductors” by The New York Times.

 

This busy 45-year-old conductor has divided her time among directorships of Symphony Tacoma and the Spartanburg (North Carolina) Philharmonic, plus the family’s East Coast base (her husband, trombonist Scott Hartman, teaches at Yale University). With a 9-year-old daughter and 7-year-old twins, and regular guest-conducting trips to Europe, life has been hectic.

 
Ioannides observes that there is “the opportunity now for women to make a lot of progress — even though we still make up only about 7 or 8 percent of orchestral-music directors. There needs to be more. And are we just token females, or are we given the same opportunities and the same pay?”

 

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A heartwarming Sounds of the Season with Tacoma Youth Chorus

The Pantages Theater stage will be brimming with musicians and instruments, including singers from 4th grade through high school, when Symphony Tacoma presents the annual Sounds of the Seasons program, featuring the Tacoma Youth Chorus. A cherished tradition in Tacoma, the pageant-style concert—conducted by Sarah Ioannides and Judy Herrington—features beloved carols, hymns and songs, including “The Little Drummer Boy,” “My Favorite Things,” “Joy to the World” and “Greensleeves,” among many others.

 

The program is studded with other great names and titles in choral and seasonal music: Tchaikovsky’s Nutcracker Dance, Vaughan Williams’s Fantasia on “Greensleeves,” Eric Whitacre’s “Glow,” John Rutter’s “Tomorrow Shall Be My Dancing Day,” Prokofiev’s “Troika,” and Leroy Anderson’s “Christmas Festival.” Symphony Tacoma’s frequent collaborator Bo Ayars has created arrangements of Rodgers & Hammerstein’s “My Favorite Things” and Richard Kountz’s “The Sleigh.” Sarah Ioannides has orchestrated Judy Herrington’s composition for women’s choir, “Stars Tonight,” which will receive its premiere during the performance!

 

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Seven vocal soloists featured in music of West Side Story during Season Opening

Symphony Tacoma will open its 2017-2018 Season with the first official observance of the highly anticipated Bernstein Centennial in the Pacific Northwest. Music Director Sarah Ioannides, whose contract with the Symphony was recently extended through 2024, will present a program featuring music from the composer/conductor’s most famous musical, West Side Story; his film score for On the Waterfront; and his opera Candide.

 

Joining her will be the Symphony Tacoma Voices and a cast of seven vocal soloists: Tess Altiveros as Maria, Elizabeth Galafa as Anita and Francisca, Bianca Raso as Rosalia, Dawn Padula as Consuela, John Marzano as Tony, John Arthur Greene as Riff, and Caisey Raiha as Bernardo.

 

West Side Story, a modern retelling of Romeo and Juliet, is set in 1950s New York City, with the Montagues being replaced by the Anglo Jets, and the Capulets by the rival Puerto Rican Sharks. The magical partnership of Bernstein and lyricist Stephen Sondheim resulted in energetic, emotional music paired with clever, memorable lyrics.

 

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Symphony announces contract extension of Music Director Sarah Ioannides

Symphony Tacoma has extended the contract of Music Director Sarah Ioannides through the 2023-2024 Season, Board President Clark D’Elia announced today.

 

“We are delighted to announce the extension of Maestra Ioannides’ contract,” stated D’Elia.  “In just three seasons, the changes she has implemented—both artistic and programmatic—have been remarkable.  She has wholeheartedly embraced and been embraced by the community, building the Orchestra’s artistic capacity, forging collaborative relationships, and bringing a new caliber of guest artists to the concert stage.  The Board is extremely pleased with the results, and we look forward to continuing this fruitful partnership for years to come.”

 

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Symphony Tacoma premiere, about Mt. Rainier’s melting glaciers

From The HUB of the League of American Orchestras

 

Washington’s Symphony Tacoma has been collaborating this spring with the Museum of Glass, Hilltop Artists Video, and Mount Rainier National Park in preparation for the May 13 world premiere of Daniel Ott’s Fire Mountain Symphony. Leading up to the concert, area residents participated in events designed to raise awareness of the plight of Mount Rainier’s rapidly melting glaciers. In March at the Museum of Glass, student artists worked with ice and molten glass in a joint performance-art event with Symphony Tacoma musicians, who played composed and improvised music as glass-blowers worked. Video footage from the event will be incorporated, together with images of Mount Rainier, for a video art piece to accompany the May 13 world premiere, led by Music Director Sarah Ioannides and featuring Symphony Tacoma and Symphony Tacoma Voices. The molten glass is meant as “a metaphor for the flowing magma within the mountain, and the ice reflects the changes to its exterior,” says the orchestra in a press release. Composer Daniel Ott is a native of Puyallup, Washington.

 

Posted May 12, 2017